Tag Archives: lifestyle

2015…..what a year you’ve been

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Bye Bye 2015

We’re in the home stretch of 2015 and I can’t even believe it. I was twenty-one when I first said I’d love to live in California for awhile and two decades later, it came true. Whether for a season or something more, this year has been special. When I was teaching, each day brought me closer and closer to winter break excitement. One of the main goals when leaving traditional education was to create a holiday lifestyle year ’round. Each day we try to reach that lofty goal. No more waiting for the weekend, day off or long extended holiday. Believing in the hype, creating the magic and always reaching for the happy…we’re trying each and every day.

“Twenty years from now you’ll be more disappointed by the things that you didn’t do than by the ones you did. So throw off the bowlines. Sail away from safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” – Mark Twain Read the rest of this entry

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Travel…an eye-opening mindset

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Zebras in Tanzania

Zebras in Tanzania

Travel has been an eye opener for me. Growing up in Long Island, New York I saw minimal diversity in my community. I was lucky enough to get to go on holidays with family throughout my childhood. We took beach holidays to Montauk, trips to Washington DC, annual visits to Disneyworld and a few jaunts to Caribbean islands or other parts of the United States. It wasn’t until I was a sophomore in university and decided to go on a three-week trip to Israel that I started to realize so many other benefits of travel. I certainly wasn’t traveling for the point of an actual education but without question, that’s what I got. I was bitten. Read the rest of this entry

Traveler Interview #8: Retire Early Lifestyle (Billy and Akaisha Kaderli)

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Billy & Akaisha Kaderli have been location-independent long before it was a recognized travel term. These two are dreamers and doers who found their own way to include travel as the focal point in their lives. They left the traditional workforce before turning forty and have been traveling and wandering the globe ever since.  Before face time conversations and amidst naysayers-they ‘left’ and haven’t looked back. Having four home-bases (where they set up housekeeping and travel out of) in Arizona (United States), Chiang Mai (Thailand), Chapala (Mexico) and  Panajachel (Guatemala), they travel with the ease found after twenty years on the road. Considering themselves ‘retired’, here they offer travelers a glimpse at life their way.

An Interview with Billy & Akaisha Kaderli of Retire Early Lifestyle

 

1.When did you get started traveling? Billy and I were both travelers before we met each other in the mid 1970’s, and it was an important ingredient to our relationship that we held in common. One of the first things we did together was to go to Europe in 1979 and spent about 6 months traveling around. Billy was a trained French Chef at the time, so we ate and drank our way through our travels. When we returned to California, we purchased a restaurant which required a lot of time and work to run. Our travel time was relegated to long weekends and two week vacations. It was because we wanted to continue to travel without limits that brought us to this lifestyle when we left the conventional working world at age 38 in 1991. We wanted to see the world and have been traveling together ever since. Read the rest of this entry

Traveler Interview #7: Midlife Road Trip’s Rick Griffin

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Interview with Midlife Road Trip (Rick Griffin)

Sailing the seas

1.When did you get started traveling? I fell in love with traveling as a child going on family vacations. As an adult I owned a small chain of child care centers and served on the board of directors for the National Child Care Association where I traveled to different parts of the country for various board and committee meetings on a regular basis. After a life-threatening illness in 2004 I reevaluated my priorities, sold my business and began pursuing my creative passions by starting a video production company.

2.What made you decide make the jump to a location independent/travel-based existence? In 2008 I won a contest for a webisode pilot I had created called “Midlife Road Trip”.  That got me to thinking how cool it would be to actually travel around the world and check things off my bucket list. I did a lot of brainstorming with friends on Twitter about the possibility of creating a regular “Midlife Road Trip” show – or at least something like it. One of those friends was Sandi McKenna. Sandi had a background in video production and was very passionate about the idea. I had never met Sandi in real life, so I took my wife and daughters to Tampa for spring break. I got to meet Sandi and we were able to brainstorm how we could make this work. We tweaked the concept, shot another pilot and put it out for the world to see. Fortunately it seemed to strike a chord with a lot of people and gave us the confidence to give it a go. Read the rest of this entry

Traveler Interview #6: A Lady in London’s Julie Falconer

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Traveler Interview #6: A Lady in London’s Julie Falconer

The travel community is filled with incredibly interesting people. Julie Falconer, of A Lady in London is one of them. Research and social media has given me the opportunity to reach out to a few prominent bloggers who are living life on their own terms. Perhaps Julie’s story will inspire you to bring the gift of travel more to the forefront of your life in a way that works for you.

Interview with A Lady in London (Julie Falconer)

1.When did you get started traveling? My first trip was to England and Scotland when I was five years old. My grandmother was from Glasgow, so my mother wanted me and my brother to see her country. I started traveling on my own when I went to a language school in Nice when I was 18. I spent most weekends in European cities, and I discovered a passion for travel. Read the rest of this entry

Traveler Interview #4: Caroline Makepeace of yTravel Blog

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Interview with ytravelblog (Caroline Makepeace)

Makepeace family- y Travel Blog

Makepeace family- y Travel Blog

1.When did you get started traveling? When I was at University, my brother moved to London to work and travel Europe. I was captivated by his stories and knew I wanted the same adventurous and carefree life. 3 days after I graduated from University in 1997, I jumped on a plane to work in London and travel. I’ve pretty much been traveling ever since.

2.What made you decide make the jump to a location independent existence? There just isn’t any other life my soul yearns for. It’s so used to living a life on its own terms that I can’t settle for anything else. I love to have complete control over how every day looks. If for whatever reason my heart and soul decides it needs to live in Bali to learn and grow more than I want the freedom to follow that urge. Read the rest of this entry

The Edventure Project : Traveler Interview #3

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The travel community is filled with incredibly interesting people. If you’ve ever thought about living, working, continuous travel and education with your family in tow – Jennifer Miller of The Edventure Project is the one to talk to. Traveling for many years and educating her family in the world’s continents and communities, Jennifer shares her story with me. Here she talks about life on the road and education in the global classroom.

The Miller Family in their travels

The Miller Family in their travels

Interview with The Edventure Project (Jennifer Miller)

1.When did you get started traveling? We took off traveling in spring 2008. We set off to cycle in Europe and N. Africa for a year… and just kind of kept going!

2.What made you decide make the jump to a location independent/travel-based existence? Our first year we were traveling on money we had saved. When the US economy crashed in the fall of 2008 the money we’d saved disappeared and we were left with a decision to make: Go home and get jobs, or find some new way to support ourselves. Ultimately, we headed to Tunisia, lived cheap for 3 months and worked on expanding our options. At the time, it seemed like a terrible thing to have happening. In retrospect it was one of the best things that could have happened because it forced creativity in a way that traveling along according to our plan might not have. It forced us to ask some fundamental questions about what we wanted from our lives and careers. Read the rest of this entry